Cassava Growth Markets

Improving the livelihoods of smallholder cassava farmers through better access to growth markets

There are a number of related projects, societies and organisations that involve several partner organisations of the 'CassavaGMarkets' project.

Cassava: Adding Value for Africa (C:AVA)
This project will develop value chains for High Quality Cassava Flour (HQCF) in Ghana, Tanzania, Uganda, Nigeria and Malawi to improve the livelihoods and incomes of small-holder households as direct beneficiaries including women and disadvantaged groups. It will promote the use of HQCF as a versatile raw material for which diverse markets exist. The project is led by the Natural Resources Institute of the University of Greenwich, working closely with: University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria; Food Research Institute, Ghana; Tanzania Food and Nutrition, Tanzania; Africa Innovations Institute, Uganda; and Chancellor College, University of Malawi and a range of other partners. Project website

C:AVA II
Cassava: Adding Value for Africa II (C:AVA II) aims to increase the incomes of at least 200,000 value chain actors, especially smallholder farmers and processors in Ghana, Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda and by at least USD177 million in five years. This will be achieved through stimulating sales of more than two million tonnes of cassava into HQCF and other cassava product value chains. C:AVA II is led by the Federal University of Agriculture Abeokuta, Nigeria, working closely with the Natural Resources Institute of the University of Greenwich; Food Research Institute Ghana; Tanzania Food and Nutrition Center, Tanzania; Africa Innovations Institute, Uganda; Chancellor College, University of Malawi alongside several partners. C:AVA II is the second phase of the C:AVA project led by the Natural Resources Institute of the University of Greenwich which ended in 2013. C:AVA II is supported by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Project website

CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas (RTB)
The CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas (RTB) is one of a series of initiatives spearheaded by the CGIAR to bring together the research synergies and resources of multiple agricultural research-for-development centers to improve efficiencies and increase impacts. The purpose of RTB is to tap the underutilized potential of root, tuber, and banana crops to improve food security, nutrition, and livelihoods. Website

EU African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Science and Technology Project
This project seeks to strengthen the science and technology capacity of ACP countries to use tropical root and tuber crops to contribute to a wide range of development issues. These include food security, poverty reduction, enterprise development and income generation, impacts of climate change and variability, impacts of urbanisation, impacts of the global food crisis and global economic downturn, opportunities provided by biofuels and export development. This will be achieved through partnership with the International Society for Tropical Root Crops (ISTRC) and organisations in East Africa, West Africa, Southern Africa, the Caribbean and Pacific to support implementation of the Action. Project website

Gratitude
Gratitude (Gains from Losses of Root and Tuber Crops), also led by the Natural Resources Institute (NRI), University of Greenwich UK, in collaboration with 15 other organisations, aimed to find solutions to reduce waste from post-harvest losses of root and tuber crops and turn unavoidable waste into something of value. Project website (archived)

Increasing the Performance of the Cassava Industry in West and Central Africa – IPCI
The main purpose of the Increasing the Performance of the Cassava Industry in WCA (IPCI) is to enhance the performance of IFAD-funded national root and tuber crops projects. It is also expected to have wider regional impact through: taking stock/dissemination of good practices and lessons learned; introduction/dissemination of technological innovations/new prototypes; enhancement of policy dialogue among relevant actors; heightening of private sector involvement and setting up of private-public partnerships. The programme draws extensively on co-financed case studies to provide a strong evidence base of successful interventions. A team of international experts on cassava processing and job creation has been made available to implement the programme and contribute to achieving the main purpose. The project commenced in November 2014 and ends in December 2017. Project website

International Society for Tropical Root Crops (ISTRC)
The International Society for Tropical Root Crops is an autonomous and non-governmental body that seeks to foster, stimulate and support any type of activity leading to the general improvement of tropical root crop production and utilisation. Website

ISTRC-Africa branch
The International Society for Tropical Root Crops-Africa Branch (ISTRC-AB) was created in 1978 to stimulate research, production and utilization of root and tuber crops along various value chains in Africa. The activities include encouragement of training and extension, organization of workshops and symposia, exchange of genetic materials, and facilitation of contact between stakeholders working with root and tuber crops. The Society’s headquarters are at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) in Ibadan, Nigeria, but its Executive Council comprises eminent root and tuber researchers from national, regional and international bodies across Africa. The aim of ISTRC-AB is to include many more Africans in the discourse of root and tuber crops. The membership is open to all root and tuber crop people whether they are researchers, business people, Government officials, heads of state, etc. In all, the principal aim is to stimulate and enhance the value chain of research, production to full utilization of root and tuber crops (RTC) in Africa. Website